‘… As you know, I’ve had a number of ‘luxury books’. They differ from ordinary books only by their format, the quality of the paper, Japanese or from the Auvergne … or the choice of typeface and its size, the limited print run (sometimes purely nominal) and the presence of engravings, whether woodcuts or lino cuts …
‘Your work leads me to a completely different view of the relationship between text and book. This is because with you the book takes on value as an object. Enough has been said about the book as object. Its disadvantage is that with such a book the text disappears, or at least it becomes no more than a pretext. You have shown me a different view in which the book carried the text like a secret – it hides it and protects it – it gives it shelter. You think you’re looking at an object and stop at this external presence. But no, it hides another. As if that was its very purpose, by hiding it, it exalts its value. You open it, something is hidden inside. If it has been hidden, it must be precious. In fact, what I find when I open your book is a series of my own texts already exalted by the engraving. It’s a double exaltation: the engraving, the secrecy. The book, which one might have thought would overpower what it contains, in fact exalts it…’

 

Jean Lescure, letter (12/2001)